Posted on: September 15, 2021 Posted by: admin Comments: 0


The Buddha’s teachings often refer to causality. The cause is the seed from which the fruit is produced. Condition is a condition for producing results. Fragrant flowers and sweet fruits depend not only on good varieties but also on the predestined conditions of heaven and earth.

Predestined to have a happy family

Humans are created by the harmony of predestined conditions. It is the combination of the five aggregates (form, feeling, perception, mental formations, consciousness). The body is obtained because of a predestined cause created by the parents. Emotions, reason, perception (feeling, perception, action, consciousness) are also formed by cause and effect. Buddha taught, because all dharmas are impermanent. Cause and effect is a dharma, so it is also impermanent. Because it is impermanent, the causes and conditions that give rise to form are also impermanent.

Most encounters in life are due to fate.

“Form is impermanent. The causes and conditions that give rise to forms are also impermanent. So, rupas are born of impermanent causes and conditions, how can they be permanent?

“In the same way, feeling, perception, mental formations, and consciousness are also impermanent. So, wake up.” [1]

The Buddha taught the bhikkhus to practice truthfully and correctly contemplating the five aggregates of impermanence. A bhikkhu who practices truthfully and correctly will detest form, feeling, perception, mental formations, and consciousness. Because of boredom, there is no desire, because there is no desire, one is liberated [2].

Liberation is the absence of ignorance and sorrow, anxiety, suffering, fear of birth, old age, illness, and death. That is Nirvana.

Namo Buddha Shakyamuni Buddha.

Here is the Sutra of Dependency (No. 11 & 12) in Journal A Ham Kinh:

Humans are created by the harmony of predestined conditions.

Humans are created by the harmony of predestined conditions.

Sutta 11. CAUSES (1)

I hear like this:

At one time, the Buddha was living in the solitary garden of the Buddha, the grove of the Kyda trees, and the country of Savatthi. At that time, the Blessed One said to the bhikkhus:

“Form is impermanent. Causes and conditions give rise to forms, which are also impermanent. So, rupas are born of impermanent causes and conditions, how can they be permanent?

“In the same way, feeling, perception, formation, and consciousness are impermanent. Causes and conditions give rise to consciousnesses, which are also impermanent. So, consciousnesses born from causes and conditions are impermanent, how can it be permanent?

“Thus, bhikkhus, form is impermanent, feeling, perception, formations, and consciousness are impermanent. What is impermanent is suffering. What is suffering, they are not us. What is not us is not our property. The Noble Disciple, contemplating like this, is bored with form, with feelings, with perception, with formations, with consciousness. Because it’s boring, I don’t like it. Because they don’t like it, they are liberated and have the knowledge of liberation, knowing that: ‘I, birth has ended, the holy life has been established, what needs to be done has been done, I know for myself that there is no more rebirth in the next life.’”

At that time, the bhikkhus, having heard the Buddha’s teachings, joyfully served them.

Sending grace

Sutta 12. CAUSES (2)

I hear like this:

At one time, the Buddha was living in the solitary garden of the Buddha, the grove of the Kyda trees, and the country of Savatthi. At that time, the Blessed One said to the bhikkhus:

“Form is impermanent. The causes and conditions that give rise to forms are also impermanent. So, rupas are born of impermanent causes and conditions, how can they be permanent?

“In the same way, feeling, perception, mental formations, and consciousness are also impermanent. So, how can consciousnesses born of impermanent causes and conditions be permanent?

“Thus, bhikkhus, form is impermanent, feeling, perception, formations, and consciousness are impermanent. What is impermanent is suffering. What is suffering, they are not us. What is not us is not our property. Such contemplation is called true contemplation. The noble disciple who contemplates in this way will be liberated from form, liberated from feeling, perception, volition, and consciousness. That, I say, is also liberation from birth, old age, sickness, death, grief, lamentation, suffering, and grief.”

At that time, the bhikkhus, having heard the Buddha’s teachings, joyfully served them.

[1] https://legacy.suttacentral.net/lzh/sa11

[2] https://legacy.suttacentral.net/lzh/sa12

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