Posted on: November 20, 2021 Posted by: admin Comments: 0


A year begins in spring, a life begins in youth. Youth is the age with the most powerful force to be able to make a career for a lifetime. The Buddha himself, he escaped from the golden prison “at a young age, with jet-black hair, with a youthful youth full of vigor”

A year begins in spring, a life begins in youth. Youth is the age with the most powerful force to be able to make a career for a lifetime. Buddha himself, His escape from the golden prison “at a young age, jet-black hair, with a youthful vigor” (Long Sutras, No. 4: Sonadanta; No. 5: Kutadanta), is a vivid example of the potential of age. young. This description can also be found in the bible, Central Sutra No. 26, that “when I was young, a teenager, with jet-black hair, full of the blood of youth, in the golden age of life, although Even though my parents were displeased, tears filled my face, I lamented, I shaved off my beard and hair, put on a kashāya, left home, left home, and lived without family. I left home like this, a person is looking for something good, seeking the unsurpassed, unsurpassed, peaceful and peaceful path.

With his youth, he could spend 6 years practicing asceticism to the extreme. Try to recall the forms of asceticism described by the Buddha in the Great Lion Roaring Sutra, No. 12 of the Central Sutra, such as eating a bean or a sesame seed (he also reminded him not to think of a bean or a sesame seed). was bigger then a pea, a sesame seed now, it’s the same thing), only youth can bear it.

With the dedication of his youth, the Buddha effectively became a monk to study, cultivate, attain and practice religion. BILLION

Lessons learned from the life of Buddha

With his youth, with extraordinary efforts in an artistic way, he then attained the truth of liberation. He sat quietly under the Bodhi tree as described in the scriptures for 49 days and nights, in order to overcome old age, sickness, death, sorrow, and defilements, and to attain “unsurpassed security from afflictions” (the Bible) Bridge, Central Business No. 26). With youthful energy, he made great efforts to meditate, practice body and mind in accordance with the dharma of the sages (Great Saccaka Sutra, No. 36 Central Sutra).

With his youth, he founded a religion that liberated life and spread widely across space and time. Buddhism was formed in India with the policy of justice, social equality, gender equality, focusing on individual efforts… like a great revolution at that time. Therefore, he encountered countless obstacles on the path of enlightenment from within his disciples as well as from outsiders. With youthful strength, he was steadfast in his footsteps and declared that “we do not argue with the world” (Mediterranean Sutra, volume I, Sutra No. 18: The Secret Service). Every day, he is diligent on the step of traveling. If he met someone with a predestined relationship to ask for the Way, or someone he found he had enough to save, he immediately went there to teach and teach. That’s it, He left, despite the blazing sun like burning fire on his head, he still persisted in the dust of the dusty road. Until evening, he stopped walking to rest. If there was a village or a nearby forest where he could stay overnight, he stayed there, sometimes resting his back in the forest like that during the cold winter weather with the sky shining on the ground. , volume I, chapter 3 dharma, chapter 4, section 34: About Aravī).

With the dedication of youth, Buddha effectively became a monk to study, cultivate, attain and practice the Way. From his own experience, he taught that “As for the young bhikkhu; Burning with enthusiasm, But without children, without children, Without inheritance, Without children, without heirs, Like the trunk of a tala tree.” (Corresponding to the Sutra, Volume I, Chapter III, Chapter 1, Section 1). Therefore, in the teachings he taught, we see that he took youth very seriously. He said there are four things young people should not despise, namely: a young king, a young monk, a small fire, and a small snake” (Contrasting the Sutras, Volume I, Chapter III, Chapter 1, Section 1).

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