Posted on: April 18, 2022 Posted by: admin Comments: 0


The Blessed One encouraged his disciples to commit themselves; take compassion, bring true love to make luggage in life, help people. That is also the strength of Buddhist practitioners to show throughout the path of self-satisfaction and forgiveness.

We all know, people live in life, each person has a different strength, forte and short. Knowing how to exploit and promote your strengths and know how to overcome and avoid your weaknesses is the foundation of all success. Mature, experienced people are never subjective, but always carefully observe to find out the strengths and weaknesses of the partner in order to behave appropriately, benefiting themselves and others.

According to the instruction of the Blessed One, the powerful kings in hand, the Arahants and the Buddhas who have achieved great liberation have the power to do so, but the child is naive, the sister is helpless. Women with weak legs and soft arms, those who let go of life also have their own strength. Those are the six forces in life.

“Once, the Buddha was living in the country of Savatthi, in the Kyda forest, in the Garden of Solitude. Then the Blessed One said to the monks:

There are six powers in life. What is six? Children use crying and crying as strength. If they want to ask for anything, they first cry; women use anger as strength, rely on anger and then speak; Sa-Mon, Brahmin using rings as strength, often thinking lowly of themselves towards people, and then expressing themselves; the king uses pride as strength, with pride like this to manifest himself; but A-la-Han takes specialized expertise as strength to present themselves; Buddhas, World-Honored Ones, have achieved great compassion, using great compassion as their strength to benefit sentient beings widely.

That is it, bhikkhu! There are six forces in life. Therefore, bhikkhus! Remember to practice this great compassion. Thus, bhikkhus, should learn this.

Then the bhikkhus, having heard the Buddha’s teaching, happily obeyed.”

(Sutra of the Most Sangha A-Ham, Volume II, Quality [1]VNCPHVN published, 1998, p.482)

The Blessed One encouraged his disciples to commit themselves; take compassion, bring true love to make luggage in life, help people.

It’s clear, nothing can stop a mother from running to her baby when she cries. For a mother, the sound of her baby crying is the most powerful command in the world. And the child, in our opinion, does not know anything, but he has learned to use the power of crying to make his mother meet the needs that he needs.

In the past, people often say that women are the weak sex, but in reality, they are not weak at all. Perhaps due to karma, real men are afraid of women’s anger and worry when they cry. Therefore, from ancient times to the present day, tears have unknowingly committed crimes and overturned many worldly affairs. So it’s not surprising that women often “take refuge in anger and then speak” and this expression is almost always very beneficial.

Ascetics or cultivators in general, vow to embark on the path of introversion and solitude, using patience and endurance to overcome obstacles. The most important thing here, according to the World-Honored One, a practitioner must always see himself as small, as a poor monk, as a beggar to be humble and courteous in his dealings with the world. It is patience and humility that are the true strength of a cultivator. By the way, one thing is revealed, a monk who likes to show his authority, flaunt his position and show off his flamboyant form is to expose his own weakness, to fall into his shortfall, not his forte.

The power of kings and queens is too obvious, whoever has more strategic generals and soldiers will win. The Buddhas and the Arhats are also diligent, using great compassion to benefit all sentient beings. The Blessed One encouraged his disciples to commit themselves; take compassion, bring true love to make luggage in life, help people. That is also the strength of Buddhist practitioners to show throughout the path of self-satisfaction and forgiveness.

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