Posted on: May 18, 2022 Posted by: admin Comments: 0


It is possible that a cultivator has not fully achieved the Precepts-Concentration-Wisdom in this life, but at least is at peace. Happiness is the foundation of Precept-Concentration.

“Once the Buddha was wandering in the country of Savatthi, in the forest of Victory, in the garden of Solitude. Then in the late afternoon, the venerable Ananda got up from his solitary place of seclusion, came to the Buddha, and paid respects. at his feet, and sat down to one side, saying:

– World-Honored One, what does keeping precepts mean?

The Buddha replied:

– Ananda, keeping precepts means making no regrets. Ananda, if anyone keeps the precepts, he will have no regrets.

“Venerable Sir, what is the meaning of not having regrets?”

“Ananda, having no regrets has the meaning of making you happy.” Ananda, if anyone has no regrets, he has joy.

“Venerable Sir, what does joy mean?”

– Ananda, to rejoice means to cause joy. Ananda, if anyone rejoices, he is happy.

– White World-Honored One, what does joy mean?

– Hey, Ananda, joy means to make only static. Ananda, if anyone has joy, he has calmness of the body.

– White World-Honored One, what does static mean?

– Hey, Ananda, static only means to cause happiness. Ananda, if someone is still, he has a pleasant feeling.

– White World-Honored One, what does happiness mean?

– Ananda, happiness means to bring about concentration. Ananda, if anyone is lost, he has concentration.” …

(The Middle A-Ham Sutra, chapter The corresponding volume, the Sutra of Ha Nghia, number 42 [trích])

Something about studying Buddhist precepts

It is possible that a cultivator has not fully achieved the Precepts-Concentration-Wisdom in this life, but at least is at peace. Happiness is the foundation of Precept-Concentration.

In this Dharma talk, the venerable Ananda asked the Blessed One, “What is the meaning of keeping the precepts?”. According to the commentary, the correct question is: What is the meaning of keeping the precepts, what is the purpose, what is the benefit? The Buddha answered very easily, keep the precepts to not regret. Precepts here mean forbidding, helping us stand on the sidelines of evil, thereby avoiding repentance and regrets later.

Without regret, the mind is joyful. Delight, pleasing, lightheaded, exhilarating is joy. And if you continue to agonize over your own joys, agonize over past mistakes, you can’t be happy. Through joy, joy arises. Joy and rejoicing are both joys, but rejoicing is jubilant joy, while the joy of rejoicing is deeper and more settled.

Thanks to the joy and happiness, the body is still only. Stillness is stillness, just rest, stillness is relaxation, body rests through rest, relaxation, and letting go. When you have let go of sensual pleasures, not chasing after objects of interest to possess, you will be happy, the light joy of letting go, so that the body is at rest, the mind is settled.

Static is only established and firmly established, then happiness arises. Bliss is also joy, but it is deeper than joy because of a calm mind. Joy continues to nourish the body and mind to help the practitioner enter deeply into concentration. Concentration here is one-pointedness by eliminating the five hindrances, reaching the attainment of the fourth jhāna, the right concentration of the Noble Eightfold Path. From this foundation of concentration, the meditator continues to develop the contemplation of eliminating fetters to achieve liberation.

Right here the Precept-Concentration path (of Precept-Concentration-Wisdom) is displayed. Although the final result leading to liberation is Wisdom, Precept-Concentration has a very important foundational role. The point to note is that the glue to stick the Precepts-Concentration is joy, happiness, tranquility, happiness, in short, peace and joy. Happiness is a sign of right practice and progress.

It is possible that a cultivator has not fully achieved the Precepts-Concentration-Wisdom in this life, but at least is at peace. Happiness is the foundation of Precepts-Concentration. The rigor in posture and conduct (keeping the precepts), the quiet introspection (meditation) may seem stoic and ascetic at first glance, but that’s only on the outside, in the depths of the inner. is peace and joy.

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